A Clockwork Orange

Editing – Montage (Part 2)

Let’s now get into the heart of the topic: montage for condensing time and space. After introducing montage as a way to display methodical actions, we will now review how this storytelling technique can help depicting trips and territorial expansions, the passing of time, Continue reading

Repetition – Sound (Part 3)

The line between diegetic and non-diegetic sound can become really blurred when remote — almost inaudible — repetitive sound is deliberately incorporated into the action. Sound repetition can itself turn into musical rhythm and completely reverse the relationship Continue reading

Repetition – Portrait galleries and evocations

Now that the topic of repetition has been touched on with fixed angles, let’s review its many different uses in movie storytelling, starting off with portrait galleries and evocations. Continue reading

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 1)

The problem with the regular and reverse cut on the look is that they are so much ubiquitous in movies that they tend to get predictable and repetitive after a while. Sometimes, we need to be more creative to add variety in our shots and keep our story interesting. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Cut on the look (Part 3)

Although the cut on the look — either objective or subjective — is already a very efficient technique as such, it is still possible to increase its effect with simple tricks. Let’s ‘look-what‘ we’ve got here. Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 2)

Here we go with the emotional aspect of zooming out. Scaling characters down by zooming out on them objectifies their figures and make them look isolated or defeated. But design and speed also have an important role Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 1)

By widening our vision field, zoom-outs give a broader view of the stage while at the same time objectifying characters by scaling them down. This twofold effect has a number of important uses. Continue reading

Scaling down – Have subjects move to the background (Part 1)

Making characters move towards the background scales them down on screen. Unsurprisingly, the emotional response from the audience is more or less the opposite to that associated to having them come to the foreground. But shrinking characters in the frame comes with Continue reading