Birdy

Editing – Montage (Part 1)

A ‘montage sequence‘ (or simply ‘montage‘) is a series of shots edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information (wikipedia). Beyond its technical aspects, a montage is also an important storytelling technique Continue reading

Repetition – Sound (Part 2)

Repetition of sound can strongly affect the way the audience perceives the image stream. As repetition of sound feels less invasive and more natural than image repetition, it is all the more insidious — and hence more powerful in that respect — even when the trick is blatantly apparent. Continue reading

Repetition – Time compression and dilation (Part 2)

Loosely speaking, the passing of time and suspension of time could be considered as extensions to the concepts of time compression and time dilation respectively. These two effects have a lot in common as they both make time an abstract concept. Continue reading

Repetition – Two-way, multiple and chain reactions

Unquestionably, reaction shots are great storytelling assets, but as we will see in this article, repetition can really take them to new heights. In fact, techniques such as two-way, multiple and chain reactions are so important that entire scenes can be built upon them Continue reading

Repetition – Portrait galleries and evocations

Now that the topic of repetition has been touched on with fixed angles, let’s review its many different uses in movie storytelling, starting off with portrait galleries and evocations. Continue reading

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 2)

Moving the camera or characters is not the only alternative to cutting on the look. There are plenty of other creative ways to draw the audience’s attention from the looking character to what he is looking at — and vice versa — in one shot, without the need to cut, Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 3)

Keeping the camera on the same side of the action plane is easy when actors stay relatively still, but how about letting them move around? Whenever a subject crosses the viewing axis, the action plane shifts from one side of the camera to the other accordingly. Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 1)

The 180-degree rule is another very important film editing guideline that ensures spatial consistency on screen. By disallowing the camera to cross the action plane, the shots of a scene look consistent regardless of the way they are edited, which makes it much easier for the audience to Continue reading

Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs

Cut-ins and cut-outs are definitely not limited to one-shot effects. Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs — like alternating zoom-ins and zoom-outs or alternating truck-ins and truck-outs — lend themselves very well to designing long series of shots — even entire scenes Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-outs

Less notorious than nested cut-ins, nested cut-outs are common place in action and ‘creative’ movies. This editing pattern incrementally moves the audience away from the action either at a slow or quick pace Continue reading