Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 2)

Moving the camera or characters is not the only alternative to cutting on the look. There are plenty of other creative ways to draw the audience’s attention from the looking character to what he is looking at — and vice versa — in one shot, without the need to cut, Continue reading

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 1)

The problem with the regular and reverse cut on the look is that they are so much ubiquitous in movies that they tend to get predictable and repetitive after a while. Sometimes, we need to be more creative to add variety in our shots and keep our story interesting. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Reverse cut on the look

So far, we have studied the cut on the look for all it’s worth. But equally important is the ‘reverse cut on the lookediting pattern. Cutting from the looking character to what is grabbing his attention is merely done in reverse: The ‘what’ is displayed just before we see the character looking at it Continue reading

Scaling down – Truck out (Part 1)

A truck-out is the opposite of a truck-in. Instead of moving forwards, the camera pulls back along its view axis to scale down the characters and their environment. Unlike zoom-outs, the camera actually moves backwards Continue reading

Scaling down – Have subjects move to the background (Part 2)

In part 1, we saw how watching subjects moving away from the camera could impact the audience emotionally — mainly because we feel unable to protect remote characters. But that is only one side of the coin. We also feel abandoned Continue reading

Dynamic occlusion – Closing shots

In Lens flares – In motion, we saw how flares could be used to ‘close’ the final shot of a film. Similarly, any type of dynamic overlays covering characters enough to make the audience lose contact with them Continue reading

Dynamic occlusion – Intruders (Part 2)

‘Intruders’ have not yet finished jumping right at our faces to obliterate what stands behind. Part 1 has been dedicated to human characters only. We will now expand dynamic sightline occlusion to multiple characters and Continue reading