Love Actually

Editing – Montage (Part 3)

Alright, we’ve been around montage for condensing time and space, let’s continue our tour with montage for condensing information, from depicting environments, events or characters, to flashbacks, evocations, assumptions and deductions. Continue reading

Repetition – Two-way, multiple and chain reactions

Unquestionably, reaction shots are great storytelling assets, but as we will see in this article, repetition can really take them to new heights. In fact, techniques such as two-way, multiple and chain reactions are so important that entire scenes can be built upon them Continue reading

Repetition – Portrait galleries and evocations

Now that the topic of repetition has been touched on with fixed angles, let’s review its many different uses in movie storytelling, starting off with portrait galleries and evocations. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Reverse cut on the look

So far, we have studied the cut on the look for all it’s worth. But equally important is the ‘reverse cut on the lookediting pattern. Cutting from the looking character to what is grabbing his attention is merely done in reverse: The ‘what’ is displayed just before we see the character looking at it Continue reading

Editing pattern – Three ways to cut on the look and back (Part 2)

In part 1, we went over the first two most common ways to cut back to the looking character after a ‘what‘ shot (i.e. using the same or a closer scale). In part 2, we will study editing pattern #3: Cutting to a longer scale shot of the looking character. And we will see how to put all those techniques together Continue reading

Editing pattern – Three ways to cut on the look and back (Part 1)

Cutting on the look from a looking character to whatever-is-drawing-his-attention is great, but the story doesn’t end there. Once we have figured out the situation, we (very) often want to cut back to the character and see him reacting. Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 3)

Keeping the camera on the same side of the action plane is easy when actors stay relatively still, but how about letting them move around? Whenever a subject crosses the viewing axis, the action plane shifts from one side of the camera to the other accordingly. Continue reading

Focus – Pointing vs Concealing (Part 2)

In part 2, we will take advantage of relatively shallow depths of field to reveal, browse and reinforce subjects. We will also see how prefocusing can make the audience expect characters to enter the frame. Continue reading