Raiders of the Lost Ark

Editing – Montage (Part 2)

Let’s now get into the heart of the topic: montage for condensing time and space. After introducing montage as a way to display methodical actions, we will now review how this storytelling technique can help depicting trips and territorial expansions, the passing of time, Continue reading

Repetition – Time compression and dilation (Part 1)

Repetition can hugely impact our perception of time. A long sequence can be radically shrunk to bring out its repetitive nature, while fast motion can be stretched out to emphasize its importance in the narrative. Continue reading

Repetition – Fixed angle

Before moving on to a thorough discussion on repetition in film storytelling, let me dwell for a page on the concept of fixed angle. A fixed angle is a shot configuration that is used more than once in a movie in order to make a specific place or action sink deep into the audience’s mind. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Reverse cut on the look

So far, we have studied the cut on the look for all it’s worth. But equally important is the ‘reverse cut on the lookediting pattern. Cutting from the looking character to what is grabbing his attention is merely done in reverse: The ‘what’ is displayed just before we see the character looking at it Continue reading

Editing pattern – Three ways to cut on the look and back (Part 1)

Cutting on the look from a looking character to whatever-is-drawing-his-attention is great, but the story doesn’t end there. Once we have figured out the situation, we (very) often want to cut back to the character and see him reacting. Continue reading

Editing – Breaking the 180-degree rule (Part 2)

As we saw in part 1, breaking the 180-degree rule can have a disruptive effect on the audience, which can prove very helpful when tackling disruptive kinds of situations, like a character harassing another one, barging into a relationship or splitting off from a group. Continue reading

Editing – Breaking the 180-degree rule (Part 1)

Now that we have spent some time demonstrating the virtues of the 180-degree rule, let’s have it the opposite way. There are many reasons why you would want to deliberately ‘break the rule’ and step through the looking glass. Continue reading

Editing – The 30-degree rule (Part 2)

In part 1, we went through two most common infringements to the 30-degree rule and saw how to keep away from them. But is the ‘rule’ always reliable? As we will see, it is certainly not bulletproof. Continue reading

Editing – The 30-degree rule (Part 1)

The 30-degree rule is a very important film editing guideline. It is also perhaps one of the most misunderstood. The ‘rule’ states that if two shots of the same subject are to be edited together and the scale of the shots doesn’t change significantly, the camera should move at least 30 degrees Continue reading

Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs

Cut-ins and cut-outs are definitely not limited to one-shot effects. Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs — like alternating zoom-ins and zoom-outs or alternating truck-ins and truck-outs — lend themselves very well to designing long series of shots — even entire scenes Continue reading