Sherlock (series)

Editing – Montage (Part 3)

Alright, we’ve been around montage for condensing time and space, let’s continue our tour with montage for condensing information, from depicting environments, events or characters, to flashbacks, evocations, assumptions and deductions. Continue reading

Editing – Multiple angles of the same subject

Editing together multiple angles of the same subject for the sake of cutting is usually not considered ‘best practice’…unless you do it repeatedly! Properly done, the result yields another powerful storytelling technique. Continue reading

Repetition – Time compression and dilation (Part 2)

Loosely speaking, the passing of time and suspension of time could be considered as extensions to the concepts of time compression and time dilation respectively. These two effects have a lot in common as they both make time an abstract concept. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-outs

Less notorious than nested cut-ins, nested cut-outs are common place in action and ‘creative’ movies. This editing pattern incrementally moves the audience away from the action either at a slow or quick pace Continue reading

Scaling down – Truck out (Part 2)

And now for the emotional and design effects of truck-outs. In part 2, we will see how scaling characters down by trucking out can tell us about their minds and feelings, as well as disconnect them from the audience Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-ins (Part 2)

When action is static and the pace of nested cut-ins quick enough, the editing pattern I call the Russian doll effect really shows off its strength. Even zoom-ins or truck-ins can be edited to look like regular nested cut-ins. Continue reading

Scaling up – Truck in (Part 1)

Trucking in (or tracking/dollying/moving in) is moving the camera towards a subject along an axis, scaling its shape much like a zoom-in. But unlike zoom-ins, truck-ins make the audience feel they are moving in space Continue reading

Focus – Perception and confusion (Part 1)

In part 1 of this article, we will see how shallow focus is used to mimic characters’ eyes focusing on a subject, even in the case of objective (i.e. non-subjective) shots. We will then see how focus is used to bring out that a character is thinking of a subject, as opposed to looking at it. Continue reading

Focus – Linking vs isolating

In this article, we will study focus for its natural ability to both link and isolate subjects. Focus is unbeatable when it comes to linking characters to their context. Conversely, focus is the perfect tool for separating Continue reading