Terminator 2 – Judgment Day

Editing – Multiple angles of the same subject

Editing together multiple angles of the same subject for the sake of cutting is usually not considered ‘best practice’…unless you do it repeatedly! Properly done, the result yields another powerful storytelling technique. Continue reading

Repetition – Time compression and dilation (Part 1)

Repetition can hugely impact our perception of time. A long sequence can be radically shrunk to bring out its repetitive nature, while fast motion can be stretched out to emphasize its importance in the narrative. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Reverse cut on the look

So far, we have studied the cut on the look for all it’s worth. But equally important is the ‘reverse cut on the lookediting pattern. Cutting from the looking character to what is grabbing his attention is merely done in reverse: The ‘what’ is displayed just before we see the character looking at it Continue reading

Editing – Breaking the 180-degree rule (Part 4)

So far, we have limited ourselves to studying the different effects of breaking the 180-degree rule from the standpoint of the story. But storytelling is not all about the story. Crossing the action plane can also be a way of pushing the audience around and spreading a bit of panic as they struggle Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 1)

The 180-degree rule is another very important film editing guideline that ensures spatial consistency on screen. By disallowing the camera to cross the action plane, the shots of a scene look consistent regardless of the way they are edited, which makes it much easier for the audience to Continue reading

Scaling down – Cut out (Part 1)

Like cut-ins, cut-outs are ubiquitous in movies, to say the least. A cut-out is nothing but an instant truck-out or zoom-out, transitioning from one shot to a wider shot along the same axis. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-ins (Part 1)

Getting closer to a subject doesn’t mean that we have to do it in one go. When action is static, or emotions need time to build up, a step-by-step approach allows the audience to gradually sneak into a scene. Continue reading

Scaling up – Truck in (Part 1)

Trucking in (or tracking/dollying/moving in) is moving the camera towards a subject along an axis, scaling its shape much like a zoom-in. But unlike zoom-ins, truck-ins make the audience feel they are moving in space Continue reading