The Avengers (series)

Repetition – Sound (Part 1)

More often than not, image and sound work together, and one understandably gets repeated when the other is. However, things get more interesting when a repetition of similar shots is used to support sound, or when speech is repeated to explain or reinforce the action. Continue reading

Repetition – Portrait galleries and evocations

Now that the topic of repetition has been touched on with fixed angles, let’s review its many different uses in movie storytelling, starting off with portrait galleries and evocations. Continue reading

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 1)

The problem with the regular and reverse cut on the look is that they are so much ubiquitous in movies that they tend to get predictable and repetitive after a while. Sometimes, we need to be more creative to add variety in our shots and keep our story interesting. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Cut on the look (Part 3)

Although the cut on the look — either objective or subjective — is already a very efficient technique as such, it is still possible to increase its effect with simple tricks. Let’s ‘look-what‘ we’ve got here. Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 1)

By widening our vision field, zoom-outs give a broader view of the stage while at the same time objectifying characters by scaling them down. This twofold effect has a number of important uses. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-ins (Part 1)

Getting closer to a subject doesn’t mean that we have to do it in one go. When action is static, or emotions need time to build up, a step-by-step approach allows the audience to gradually sneak into a scene. Continue reading

Focus – Pointing vs Concealing (Part 2)

In part 2, we will take advantage of relatively shallow depths of field to reveal, browse and reinforce subjects. We will also see how prefocusing can make the audience expect characters to enter the frame. Continue reading

Overlays – Translucency and opacity

Translucent and opaque overlays make it even more difficult for the audience to keep up with characters’ intentions. By concealing their traits, those overlays play on the tendency of human nature to Continue reading