The Shining

Editing – From short to subliminal shot

What’s the difference [eat at Joe’s] between a very short shot and a subliminal shot? Answer: Not much. Sure… but let’s put it another way: Does shortening a shot to a single frame [eat at Joe’s] makes it subliminal? And what does [eat at Joe’s] subliminal mean anyway? Continue reading

Repetition – Sound (Part 2)

Repetition of sound can strongly affect the way the audience perceives the image stream. As repetition of sound feels less invasive and more natural than image repetition, it is all the more insidious — and hence more powerful in that respect — even when the trick is blatantly apparent. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Cut on the look (Part 3)

Although the cut on the look — either objective or subjective — is already a very efficient technique as such, it is still possible to increase its effect with simple tricks. Let’s ‘look-what‘ we’ve got here. Continue reading

Editing pattern – Cut on the look (Part 1)

The ‘cut on the look‘ is probably one the most natural — and common — cuts ever. Whenever a character turns his head and looks off-screen, we invariably want to know what has grabbed his attention and expect the following shot to answer that question. It seems we are never tired of that simple ‘look-what‘ sequence of shots. Continue reading

Editing – Breaking the 180-degree rule (Part 1)

Now that we have spent some time demonstrating the virtues of the 180-degree rule, let’s have it the opposite way. There are many reasons why you would want to deliberately ‘break the rule’ and step through the looking glass. Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 3)

Keeping the camera on the same side of the action plane is easy when actors stay relatively still, but how about letting them move around? Whenever a subject crosses the viewing axis, the action plane shifts from one side of the camera to the other accordingly. Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 2)

As we have seen in part 1, the 180-degree rule is based on two kinds of action planes: ‘directional’ and ‘relational’ planes. Keeping the camera on the same side of those planes during a scene brings a sense of spatial consistency to the shots, even when characters don’t or remotely relate to each other Continue reading

Scaling down – Cut out (Part 1)

Like cut-ins, cut-outs are ubiquitous in movies, to say the least. A cut-out is nothing but an instant truck-out or zoom-out, transitioning from one shot to a wider shot along the same axis. Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 1)

By widening our vision field, zoom-outs give a broader view of the stage while at the same time objectifying characters by scaling them down. This twofold effect has a number of important uses. Continue reading