Thelma and Louise

Editing – Montage (Part 1)

A ‘montage sequence‘ (or simply ‘montage‘) is a series of shots edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information (wikipedia). Beyond its technical aspects, a montage is also an important storytelling technique Continue reading

Editing – Alternatives to the ‘cut on the look’ (Part 2)

Moving the camera or characters is not the only alternative to cutting on the look. There are plenty of other creative ways to draw the audience’s attention from the looking character to what he is looking at — and vice versa — in one shot, without the need to cut, Continue reading

Editing pattern – Reverse cut on the look

So far, we have studied the cut on the look for all it’s worth. But equally important is the ‘reverse cut on the lookediting pattern. Cutting from the looking character to what is grabbing his attention is merely done in reverse: The ‘what’ is displayed just before we see the character looking at it Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 3)

Keeping the camera on the same side of the action plane is easy when actors stay relatively still, but how about letting them move around? Whenever a subject crosses the viewing axis, the action plane shifts from one side of the camera to the other accordingly. Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 2)

As we have seen in part 1, the 180-degree rule is based on two kinds of action planes: ‘directional’ and ‘relational’ planes. Keeping the camera on the same side of those planes during a scene brings a sense of spatial consistency to the shots, even when characters don’t or remotely relate to each other Continue reading

Scaling down – Truck out (Part 2)

And now for the emotional and design effects of truck-outs. In part 2, we will see how scaling characters down by trucking out can tell us about their minds and feelings, as well as disconnect them from the audience Continue reading

Focus – Perception and confusion (Part 1)

In part 1 of this article, we will see how shallow focus is used to mimic characters’ eyes focusing on a subject, even in the case of objective (i.e. non-subjective) shots. We will then see how focus is used to bring out that a character is thinking of a subject, as opposed to looking at it. Continue reading

Lens flares – Fatality, anxiety

In part 1, we saw that lens flares could be used to depict memories or give a touch of confusion and unreality. But lens flares are also often used to emphasize hopeless situations and convey a sense of fatality, as well as Continue reading

Overlays – Distorting veils

Yes, this article could as well be labeled as “Image distortion (Part 3)” (read more in Image distortion (Part 1)). But here, image deformation is seen through the lens of overlays. Unlike transparent ‘veils’, distorting overlays not only Continue reading