Framing

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Repetition – Fixed angle

Before moving on to a thorough discussion on repetition in film storytelling, let me dwell for a page on the concept of fixed angle. A fixed angle is a shot configuration that is used more than once in a movie in order to make a specific place or action sink deep into the audience’s mind. Continue reading

Focus – Perception and confusion (Part 2)

In part 1, we saw how focus could ‘flesh out’ characters’ mental representations of a subject. Let’s dig a little deeper with unawareness and confusion, both closely related with characters’ mind and perception. Continue reading

Focus – Perception and confusion (Part 1)

In part 1 of this article, we will see how shallow focus is used to mimic characters’ eyes focusing on a subject, even in the case of objective (i.e. non-subjective) shots. We will then see how focus is used to bring out that a character is thinking of a subject, as opposed to looking at it. Continue reading

Focus – Power and intrusion

After spending some time on focus ability to link and isolate, let’s now consider its empowering and belittling effect on characters, their speech, and how intruders can benefit from coming ‘out of the blur’ and claiming focus. Continue reading

Focus – Linking vs isolating

In this article, we will study focus for its natural ability to both link and isolate subjects. Focus is unbeatable when it comes to linking characters to their context. Conversely, focus is the perfect tool for separating Continue reading

Focus – Pointing vs Concealing (Part 3)

In part 3, we will concentrate on different focus techniques commonly used to lead the eye from one subject to another: inserts, direct cuts, and focus pulling. We will also see that some actions can benefit from remaining out of focus. Continue reading

Focus – Pointing vs Concealing (Part 2)

In part 2, we will take advantage of relatively shallow depths of field to reveal, browse and reinforce subjects. We will also see how prefocusing can make the audience expect characters to enter the frame. Continue reading

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