Motion

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Alternating truck-ins and truck-outs

It might seem counterintuitive to truck in then truck out (or vice versa) in the same shot, or series of shots. But like zoom-ins and zoom-outs, truck-ins and truck-outs have a whole range of meanings Continue reading

Scaling down – Truck out (Part 2)

And now for the emotional and design effects of truck-outs. In part 2, we will see how scaling characters down by trucking out can tell us about their minds and feelings, as well as disconnect them from the audience Continue reading

Scaling down – Truck out (Part 1)

A truck-out is the opposite of a truck-in. Instead of moving forwards, the camera pulls back along its view axis to scale down the characters and their environment. Unlike zoom-outs, the camera actually moves backwards Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 2)

Here we go with the emotional aspect of zooming out. Scaling characters down by zooming out on them objectifies their figures and make them look isolated or defeated. But design and speed also have an important role Continue reading

Scaling down – Zoom out (Part 1)

By widening our vision field, zoom-outs give a broader view of the stage while at the same time objectifying characters by scaling them down. This twofold effect has a number of important uses. Continue reading

Scaling down – Have subjects move to the background (Part 2)

In part 1, we saw how watching subjects moving away from the camera could impact the audience emotionally — mainly because we feel unable to protect remote characters. But that is only one side of the coin. We also feel abandoned Continue reading

Scaling down – Have subjects move to the background (Part 1)

Making characters move towards the background scales them down on screen. Unsurprisingly, the emotional response from the audience is more or less the opposite to that associated to having them come to the foreground. But shrinking characters in the frame comes with Continue reading

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