Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 2)

As we have seen in part 1, the 180-degree rule is based on two kinds of action planes: ‘directional’ and ‘relational’ planes. Keeping the camera on the same side of those planes during a scene brings a sense of spatial consistency to the shots, even when characters don’t or remotely relate to each other Continue reading

Editing – The 180-degree rule (Part 1)

The 180-degree rule is another very important film editing guideline that ensures spatial consistency on screen. By disallowing the camera to cross the action plane, the shots of a scene look consistent regardless of the way they are edited, which makes it much easier for the audience to Continue reading

Editing – The 30-degree rule (Part 2)

In part 1, we went through two most common infringements to the 30-degree rule and saw how to keep away from them. But is the ‘rule’ always reliable? As we will see, it is certainly not bulletproof. Continue reading

Editing – The 30-degree rule (Part 1)

The 30-degree rule is a very important film editing guideline. It is also perhaps one of the most misunderstood. The ‘rule’ states that if two shots of the same subject are to be edited together and the scale of the shots doesn’t change significantly, the camera should move at least 30 degrees Continue reading

Editing – The parallel-axis cut

If ‘taking a closer look’ is often associated with cut-ins, then ‘closely examining’ is the realm of parallel-axis cuts. Presented in succession, shots of different parts of a subject sharing the same viewing axis Continue reading

Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs

Cut-ins and cut-outs are definitely not limited to one-shot effects. Alternating cut-ins and cut-outs — like alternating zoom-ins and zoom-outs or alternating truck-ins and truck-outs — lend themselves very well to designing long series of shots — even entire scenes Continue reading

Editing pattern – Nested cut-outs

Less notorious than nested cut-ins, nested cut-outs are common place in action and ‘creative’ movies. This editing pattern incrementally moves the audience away from the action either at a slow or quick pace Continue reading

Scaling down – Cut out (Part 3)

We have come through the descriptive aspects of cut-outs, let’s now see how they comply with typical emotional reactions of the audience, and how they are commonly used as design effects. Continue reading

Scaling down – Cut out (Part 2)

In part 1, we saw how cut-outs could be used to reveal context and action, but what about exposing characters? How about creating space to unbalance the frame so that we expect a subject to show up and fill the void? Continue reading

Scaling down – Cut out (Part 1)

Like cut-ins, cut-outs are ubiquitous in movies, to say the least. A cut-out is nothing but an instant truck-out or zoom-out, transitioning from one shot to a wider shot along the same axis. Continue reading