The dark side of light – Someone’s lurking

Wolves come out at night. The audience is scrutinizing the shade to find evidence of a danger before it’s too late. When light is low, it’s time to worry.

Extreme low-key scenes increase insecurity by wrapping potentially dangerous characters in a veil of shade.

 

Predators’ hideout

In West Side Story (J. Robbins & R. Wise, 1961), this character wants to meet up with his friends after a tragic street fight has degenerated. His dark figure looks suspicious in the shade.
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In Thelma and Louise (R. Scott, 1991), J.D. is taking advantage of gullible Thelma and things are taking a turn for the worse.
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Here’s a killer who has broken into his victim’s flat and is silently heading towards her bedroom in Someone to Watch Over Me (R.Scott, 1987).
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What’s up?
Low-key scenes raise the audience’s feeling of insecurity. A dark figure on a dark background is all it takes to pass any character off as an evil-minded persona and freak the audience out.

 

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